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Charles GREENLAW

Charles GREENLAW

Male *[1738] - 1811

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  • Name Charles GREENLAW 
    Born *[1738] 
    • Charles was enlisted in the company of Capt Jabez Bradbury at St Georges Fort in 1754. If he was of age at the time, he would have been at least 16 years old.
    Gender Male 
    Birth [1745] 
    Immigration SUMMER 1753  Dolphin: Greenock to America Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    • https://archive.org/stream/annalsoftownofwa00lceato#page/84/mode/2up/search/dolphin
      Annals Of The Town Of Warren: With The Early History Of St. George's, Broad Bay And The Neighboring Settlements On The Waldo Patent 4 editions
      By Cyrus Eaton
      p 85 Greenlaw on the Dolphin 1753

      These offers attracted the attention of sundry persons in Stirling, Glasgow, and other places in Scotland, who, after consultation, entered into an agreement, the terms of which are not exactly known, to emigrate. Some of them, who were without families, agreed to work for Waldo four years in payment of their passage. Others, at stipulated times after their arrival, were to pay for their passages as well as for supplies furnished. Being collected for embarkation to the number of sixty, besides ten or more children, who went passage free, they went on board the brig Dolphin, Captain Cooters, in the summer of 1753, and, after touching at Piscataqua, where they remained a week or more, arrived in George's river in September. Dr. Robinson had contracted with Waldo to erect a house, and have it ready for their reception on their arrival. This he commenced near the house occupied by the late Capt. Dagget, since rebuilt by his grandson, E. B. Alford. He built the walls of logs, and partitioned the inside into fourteen rooms designed to accommodate the whole company, which contained that number of families. But from the want of materials, or other cause, the roof was never made, and the structure remained unfinished and unoccupied till the timber decayed. In consequence of Robinson's failure to complete this job, the emigrants scattered round and lived the first winter with the old settlers. Provisions were supplied them by Waldo; who appointed Boice Cooper a kind of commissary to take charge of, and deliver them out at stated times. The names of these emigrants were Archibald Anderson, John Dicke, Andrew Malcolm, John Miller, John Crawford, Thomas Johnston, John Mucklewee, John Brison, Andrew Bird, John Kirkpatrick, John Hodgins, John Carswell, John Brown, Robert Kye, Grenlaw, Wilke, Beverage, Auchmuty, and Anderson. They were mostly mechanics, and unacquainted with all agricultural operations, except reaping and threshing. Malcolm was a Glasgow weaver; and Archibald Anderson, who married his sister and belonged to Bannockburn, was of the same trade, and had worked in the same city. Dicke of Stirling, was a maltster and brewer, Miller a delfware manufacturer, Kirkpatrick a cooper, Hodgins a bookbinder, Crawford a shepherd or herdsman, and Auchmuty a slaie maker. Having the promise of lands within two miles of tide waters, they naturally looked forward to the comforts of city life to which they had been accustomed at home; and fearful of Indian hostilities, and unacquainted as they were with the wild beasts that frequented the woods, they could not think of going to separate farms, and fixing their habitations at a distance from each other.
    Military From 9 May 1754 to 1 Dec 1758 
    French War 
    Residence 1760  Second Parish [Cape Elizabeth], Falmouth, Cumberland, ME Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/1055547?availability=Family%20History%20Library
      Massachusetts State Archives collection, colonial period, 1622-1788
      Authors: Massachusetts. State Archives
      v. 128 -- Usurpation (from p.109), 1688 ; v. 129 -- Usurpation, 1688-1689 ; v. 130 -- Valuation of Towns (to p.436), 1760-1770.
      Granite Mountain Record Vault
      United States & Canada Film
      2400777
      7703441
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/007703441?cat=1055547
      [832/1139]
      A List of the Polls and the Estates Real and Personal of the Several Proprietors and Inhabitants of the Second Parish Falmouth for the year 1761
      William Simonton
      William Cotton
      Humphrey Merrills
      Assessors for the Town of Falmouth for the year 17[torn]
      This to certify that there has Ben Several Persons moved out of the Second Parish in this Town Sence the List was taken in the year 1760 and Several that are taken in the first Parish.
      ...
      [834/1139]
      Jonathan Greenlaw [84+ acres]
      Polls rateable: 1
      Dwelling Houses and Still houses: 1
      Oxen four years old and upwards: 2
      Cows and Heifers of three years old and upwards: 1 [7?]
      Sheep one year old and upwards: 12
      Swine one year old and upwards: 1
      Acres of pasturage and what number of Cows it will keep yearly: 60-20
      Acres Tillage Land: 2
      Bushels of Grain and Corn of each Sort: 20
      Acres of Mowing Land: 20
      Tuns of English And upland Hay it yields in one year: 20
      Acres of Salt Marsh and what it yields in one year: 2-2
      Sum Total of Rents: 17 1 3 [By far the greatest value in the Parish
      [Next entry from Jonathan Greenlaw is William Green 1 poll rateable. There appears to have been a William Green living in Falmouth at the time.]

      [836/1139]
      Charles Greenlaw 1 poll rateable
      Ebenezer Greenlaw 1 poll rateable
      Alexander Greenlaw 1 poll rateable

      The foregoing lists is the Total of the Real Estate & Personal of the Town of Falmouth in the County of Cumberland Taken by
      William Cotton
      William Simonton
      Humphrey Merrill
      Assessors: For 1760
    Residence 1762  [Deer Isle, Lincoln, ME] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • An historical sketch of the town of Deer Isle, Maine
      p 24
      Chapter II
      First Settlers

      The first permanent settlement was made in 1762 by William Eaton, although he was not the first who began one.
      Alexander Greenlaw, Charles Greenlaw, Ebenezer Greenlaw, Jonathan Greenlaw, William Greenlaw 1762
    Residence 1762  Campbell's Neck, Deer Isle, Lincoln, ME Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • https://books.google.com/books?id=dvc7AAAAIAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false
      The Maine Historical Magazine
      Volume 8 Page 13
      Deer Isles and Settlers
      ...
      [1762] Jonathan, Charles, Ebenezer, Alexander and William Greenlaw settled on Campbell's Neck. They all moved to Castine and from thence to St Andrews, New Brunswick. Two of the sons of Jonathan returned and settled at Deer Isle.

      p 13-14
      Petition to the General Court 1762
      [For Deer Isle, Maine]
      Jonathan Greenlaw
      Ebenezer Greenlaw
      Charles Greenlaw
      Alex Greenlaw
      William Greenlaw

      p 14
      1763 William Foster from Dedham, Massachusetts, settled on the Greenlaw lands; he had sons.
    Petition 4 Aug 1762  [Deer Isle, Lincoln, ME] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • https://books.google.com/books?id=pdA-AAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false
      Bangor Historical Magazine
      Volume 1: July 1883-June 1886
      Joseph W Porter, Editor and Publisher
      p 195
      Deer Island Papers

      Petition of Inhabitants 1762
      "Province of the Massachusetts Bay, to his Excellency Francis Bernard, Esq., Captain, General and Governor in Chief of the said Province, the Hon'ble His Majesty's Council and the Hon'ble House of Representatives in General Court assembled, Aug. 4, 1762.

      The subscribers humbly show that sixteen of them have been at considerable expense at transporting themselves to a certain Island at the eastward, within this Province, situated on the southwest of Egemogen Reach, known by the name of Deer Island, which at high water seems to be separated into two, tho' at low water appears to be one Intire Island, have built themselves Houses, and are with the rest of your Petitioners willing to bring forward a settlement there. Pray this Court for the Incouragement of so good a work, to make them a grant of the whole of said Island, or at least that end of it, settled upon as aforesaid ; which is accounted to be about six or seven miles in length, and two or three in breadth in the widest part thereof; tho' in some places not half a mile. Or otherwise to dispose of the whole of said Island to them, or only the southeast end aforesaid, as this Court in their Wisdom shall think fit for such sum or sums of money as may be judged reasonable, and your Petitioners beg leave further to add that they are not Petitioners included in the twelve townships already granted
      Daniel Wardwell
      Jeremiah Wardwell
      Dan'l Clark
      Dan'l Clark in behalf of Edward Jones
      Jno Stone
      Moses Sewall
      Daniel Holt
      Stephen Littlefield
      William Grinnell
      Jonathan Greenlaw
      Ebenezer Greenlaw
      Charles Greenlaw
      Alex Greenlaw
      William Greenlaw
      George Lilly
      John Winn
      John Staple
      Ebenezer Low
      Samuel Low
      Nathan Closson
      David Torrey
      Joseph Thomas
      Michael Carnay
      John Tinker
      William Eaton
      Elakin Eaton
      John Cane
      Enoch Hutchins
      Nathaniel Webber
      [Massachusetts Archives Volume 46 page 488]

      "Resolve on the petition of the inhabitants of Deer-Island, granting and confirming one hundred acres of land to each of said settlers, on condition. March 22, 1786.

      Whereas it appears to this Court from a survey and plan of a certain island, lying within the county of Lincoln, called Deer-Island, taken by Rufus Putnam, Esq.; in the year 1785, together with a small island lying near the west shore of the said Deer-Island, called Sheep-Island, that the said islands contain in the whole, sixteen thousand eight hundred and seventy-six acres, whereon were eighty settlers, before the first day of January, 1784; and whereas Joseph Tyler and others, settlers on the said islands, have petitioned this Court for a grant of the same, to them, their heirs and assigns: Therefore

      Resolved, That there be, and here is hereby granted and confirmed to the said Joseph Tvler, and the other settlers, who settled thereon and made a separate improvement before the first day of January, 1784, their heirs and assigns, one hundred acres each, to hold in severalty, to be laid out so as to include their respective improvements, as a compensation for settlement; on condition, that the aforesaid settlers pay into the treasury of this Commonwealth, within one year from the date thereof, for the survey, and other charges, one hundred and twenty pounds, in specie, with interest until paid ; provided that where any original settler has sold, or otherwise disposed of his improvements, the purchaser of such improvements, his heirs and assigns, shall hold the same lands which such original settler would have held by virtue of this resolve, if there had been no such sale or disposition.

      And be it further Resolved, That the remainder of the said Deer- Island, with all the privileges and appurtenances to the same belonging, be, and is hereby granted and confirmed to the said
      Joseph Tyler
      Mark Haskell
      Joseph Colby
      John Campbell
      Charles Pressey
      Ignatius Haskell
      Thomas Saunders
      Edward Haskell
      Joshua Haskell
      Thomas Haskell
      Jonathan Eaton
      Ezekiel Marshall
      George Tyler
      Thomas Stinson, Jun
      Belcher Tyler
      Nathan Dow
      John Pressey
      Thomas Stinson
      Nathan Closson
      Elijah Donham
      Theophilus Eaton
      Levi Carman
      Ezra Howard
      Ambrose Colby
      Nathaniel Bray
      Robert Nason
      Benjamin Cole
      Ezekiel Moory
      John Hooper
      Lot Curtis
      Chase Pressey
      Thomas Saunders
      Samuel Frunday
      John Raynes
      Samuel Raynes
      Thomas Smalley
      Job Smalley
      Charles Sellers
      Josiah Crocket
      Thomas Robbins
      William Babbage
      Joseph Whitmore
      William Greenlaw
      George Frees
      Cortney Babbage
      John Frees
      Peter Hardy
      Jeremiah Eaton
      William Eaton
      John Closson
      Thomas Thompson
      Robert Lin
      Marcy Staples
      Charles Greenlaw
      Simon Fowier
      David Torry
      Jonathan Torry
      Samuel Crombie
      Joseph Donha
      their heirs and assigns ; on condition, that they appropriate three hundred acres of land for the use of the ministry, and three hundred acres for the use of a grammar school, and that they pay into the treasury of this Commonwealth, within one year from the time of passing this resolve, one thousand two hundred and forty-one pounds, eight shillings, in consolidated securities of this Commonwealth, with interest."
    • The Bangor Historical Magazine, Volume 1
      edited by Joseph Whitcomb Porter
      p 195
      Deer Island Papers
      Petition of Inhabitants 1762
      ...
      [For a grant of land on Deer Island]
      ...
      Jonathan Greenlaw
      Ebenezer Greenlaw
      Charles Greenlaw
      Alex. Greenlaw
      William Greenlaw
      ...
      [Massachusetts Archives Volume 46 Page 488]

      ...

      "Resolve on the petition of the inhabitants of Deer-Island, granting and confirming 100 acres of land to each of said settlers, on condition. 22 March 1786"
      ...
      80 settlers before 1 January 1784
      ...
      "whereas Joseph Tyler and others, settlers on the said islands [Deer and Sheep], have petitioned this Court for a grant of the same, to them, their heirs and assigns:"
      ...
      settle and improved before 1 January 1784
      pay for survey
      appropriate 300 acres for the ministry
      ...
      to
      ...
      Robert Nason...
      William Greenlaw...
      Charles Greenlaw...

      Town incorporated 30 January 1789
    Residence 10 Dec 1767  Deer Isle, Lincoln, ME Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Occupation September 1779 
    Laborer 
    • The Maine Genealogist. Farmington, ME: The Maine Genealogical Society, 1977-. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014.)
      Volume 26 Page 51
      The Artificers and Inhabitants who Built Fort George, Penobscot, 1779-1780
      by Robert Carver Brooks
      p 58
      Inhabitants Employed During September 1779
      Skill - Pay Rate - Name - No Days
      Laborer 1/- Cha Greenlaw 8
      Laborer 1/- Eben Greenlaw 8
      Laborer 1/- Jon Greenlaw 8

      p 62
      Inhabitants Employed During March 1780
      Laborer 2/6 Jon Greenlaw 8 1/2
      Laborer 2/6 Cha Greenlaw 8 1/2
      Laborer 2/6 Alex Greenlaw 8 1/2
      Laborer 2/6 Will Greenlaw 10

      The Maine Genealogist. Farmington, ME: The Maine Genealogical Society, 1977-. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2018.)
      https://www.americanancestors.org/DB531/rd/14529/58/265106018
      p 58
      https://www.americanancestors.org/DB531/rd/14529/62/265106304
      p 62

      The lists of names presented below were compiled from over 300 pages of payrolls and accounts which name the artificers, military personel, and inhabitants who built Fort George, Penobscot. All accounts are marked "Duplicate" and were kept by the Engineer Department at Majabigwaduce (now Castine). The accounts are dated from 22 May 1779 to 30 June 1780 and, following 28 blank pages, from 1 March 1783 to 31 December 1783. The volume is now preserved at the Public Record Office (PRO), Great Britain's national archives at Kew in Surrey. It was microfilmed in 1991 for the National Archives of Canada. The PRO citation is:
      AO [Audit Office] 3/141 Account Books 1764-1783
    Occupation March 1780 
    Laborer 
    • The Maine Genealogist. Farmington, ME: The Maine Genealogical Society, 1977-. (Online database. AmericanAncestors.org, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014.)
      Volume 26 Page 51
      The Artificers and Inhabitants who Built Fort George, Penobscot, 1779-1780
      by Robert Carver Brooks
      p 58
      Inhabitants Employed During September 1779
      Skill - Pay Rate - Name - No Days
      Laborer 1/- Cha Greenlaw 8
      Laborer 1/- Eben Greenlaw 8
      Laborer 1/- Jon Greenlaw 8

      p 62
      Inhabitants Employed During March 1780
      Laborer 2/6 Jon Greenlaw 8 1/2
      Laborer 2/6 Cha Greenlaw 8 1/2
      Laborer 2/6 Alex Greenlaw 8 1/2
      Laborer 2/6 Will Greenlaw 10
    Residence 6 Aug 1786  [Deer Isle, Hancock, ME] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Emigration 1789  St Andrews, Charlotte, NB Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 11 May 1789  [Deer Isle, Hancock, ME] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence 29 Sep 1789  St Andrews, Charlotte, NB Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/334690?availability=Family%20History%20Library
      Deeds 1791-1861; index 1791-1864
      Authors: Hancock County (Maine). Register of Deeds
      Deeds v. 3-4, 1794-1797
      Family History Library
      United States & Canada Film
      10948
      7834660
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/007834660?cat=334690
      Volume 3 Page 48
      [31/596]
      Jonathan Greenlaw, Charles Greenlaw, Alexander Greenlaw yeomen Saint Andrews heirs of William Greenlaw late of Deer Isle deceased
      John Campbell yeoman Deer Isle
      60 pounds
      100 acres on Deer Isle original settlement of our aforesaid Honoured Father William Greenlaw deceased
      lying eastwardly on the Sea shore
      southwardly by Mark Haskell and Son's Land
      westwardly on commonland
      northwardly by land lately owned and possessed by Jonathan Greenlaw
      42 rods wide
      29 September 1789
      Jonathan Greenlaw
      Marey Greenlaw
      Ebenezer Greenlaw
      Aleander Greenlaw
      Wit: Peter Powers, Geo Tyler, William Greenlaw, Nathl Hamlett
      Lincoln Ss October 3d 1789. Then Personally appeared the within named Jonathan Greenlaw, Ebenezer Greenlaw, Alexr Greenlaw and acknowledged the within Instrument by them subscribed to be therefore act and deed
      Before me
      Nicholas Holt Justice Peace
      Recd & Regs Septr 16th 1794
      Attt William Webber Registrar
    Death C 1810  St Andrews, Charlotte, NB Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • The Loyalists of Massachusetts
      Their Memorials, Petitions, and Claims
      E Alfred Jones
      Cearfield, MD
      1969

      p 154
      Jonathan, Ebenezer and Alexander Greenlaw

      These three loyalists (whose aged parents died about 1776) had lands on Deer Island, near Penobscot. They were all taken prisoners, with their brother Charles, by the "rebel brig Pallas," and treated with every indignity, so much so that Charles became insane. They were all settled at St Andrews, New Brunswick, in 1786. (A.O 13/50.) The three brother claimed L657 1s, and were allowed L50 each. (A.O. 12/109.) According to Sabine, Jonathan died in 1818, aged 80; Ebenezer about 1810, aged 70; and Charles about 1810, aged 70, all at St Andrews.
    Death 1810  70 years Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Aged 1811  65 years Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Residence Lot 54?, St Andrews, Charlotte, NB Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Son Solomon sells portion of 54
    Died 1811  St Andrews, Charlotte, NB Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I43434  4 February 2018
    Last Modified 19 Sep 2019 

    Father William GREENLAW,   b. Bef 1694?,   d. [1776] 
    Mother Jane,   d. [1783-1786] 
    Family ID F4727  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Mercy HATHORNE,   b. 1743,   d. Bef 1822 ASSESS? 
    Married 10 Dec 1767  Pownalborough, Lincoln, ME Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • The Maine Historical Magazine, Volume 9
      p 101
      Marriages from Lincoln County Records
      By David Fales, Just. Pacis.
      1767 Dec 10 Charles Greenlaw of a place called Deer Island and Mercy Jameson of a place called St Georges [Lincoln County later Knox County]

      http://archives.mainegenealogy.net/2010/03/lincoln-county-marriages-1759-1777.html

      Court records, 1761-1989
      Authors: Maine. Court of General Sessions
      [713/1111]
      Decr 10 1767 Charles Greenlaw of a place called Deer Island and Mercy Jameson of a Place called St George
      Before me David Fales Just Pacis

      Charles GREENLAW Lincoln County, ME: Commissioners Marriage Records, 1759-1777 Vital Records (incl. Bible, Cemetery, Church and SSDI)
      MARRIAGE : 12/10/1767
      LOCATION : Wiscasset, Lincoln, Maine, United States
      VOLUME : Lincoln County, Maine Marriages
      PAGE : 12
      SPOUSE : Mercy Jameson
    Children 
     1. Alexander GREENLAW,   b. Between LATE 1760S and EARLY 1770S?,   d. BY 1819
     2. Mercy GREENLAW,   b. [1776],   d. 29 Aug 1841, Calais, Washington, ME Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Martha GREENLAW,   b. [1778], MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1870 CENSUS
     4. Mary GREENLAW,   b. 1 Sep 1780,   d. 25 Sep 1850, Crawford, Washington, ME Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years)
     5. Solomon GREENLAW,   b. [1784],   d. Bef 1840 CENSUS
     6. Charles GREENLAW
     7. Jedediah GREENLAW,   b. C 1789,   d. Bef 1822 TAX?
    Family ID F12922  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Documents
    Notes on the First Greenlaw Generation in Maine and New Brunswick
    Notes on the First Greenlaw Generation in Maine and New Brunswick
    Ebenezer Greenlaw Loyalist Claim
    Ebenezer Greenlaw Loyalist Claim
    Timeline of the Greenlaws during the Revolutionary War
    Timeline of the Greenlaws during the Revolutionary War
    Timeline of the Greenlaws during the Revolutionary War
    Determining the Children of the New Brunswick Greenlaw Brothers
    Determining the Children of the New Brunswick Greenlaw Brothers
    Greenlaw French and Indian War Records
    Greenlaw French and Indian War Records
    The French and Indian War and the Arrival of the Greenlaws in Maine
    The French and Indian War and the Arrival of the Greenlaws in Maine
    Petition for Deer Isle 1762
    Petition for Deer Isle 1762

  • Notes 
    • Scotland's People Website 5 October 2014: Nil
      Genealogical and Family History of the State of Maine Volumes 1-4: Nil
      Colonial Soldiers and Officers in New England (NEHGS): Nil
      Penobscot Inhabitants Certified Loyal 1783 [Carver]: Nil
      Penobscot Loyalists Settled at Passamaquoddy 1784 [Carver]: Nil
      Back Lands 1784: Nil
      British Military and Naval Records [Including War of 1812 and Revolutionary War ] (RG 8, C Series) - INDEX ONLY [Library and Archives of Canada]: Nil Greenlaws
      Falmouth Assessment 1761: Nil

      Evidence for Children:
      Mercy: Named after mother? The only Mercy Greenlaw. Names a son Charles. r St Stephen 1801, r St Andrews 1802, r St Andrews 1814, r St Stephen 1820, r Calais 1830
      Martha: r St Stephen 1799 r St David 1803 r Machias 1810
      Mary: Names a son Charles Greenlaw Fenlason. r Machias 1810
      Solomon: Mercy wid Charles sells him land.
      Jedediah: Mary Greenlaw m Nathaniel Fenlason names a son Jedediah Greenlaw Fenlason

      Mary Greenlaw Conway 1983
      Children of Charles Greenlaw and Mercy Hawthorne
      Chales
      Solomon
      Martha
      Mary
      Jedediah
    • The Loyalists of Massachusetts
      Their Memorials, Petitions, and Claims
      E Alfred Jones
      Cearfield, MD
      1969

      p 154
      Jonathan, Ebenezer and Alexander Greenlaw

      These three loyalists (whose aged parents died about 1776) had lands on Deer Island, near Penobscot. They were all taken prisoners, with their brother Charles, by the "rebel brig Pallas," and treated with every indignity, so much so that Charles became insane. They were all settled at St Andrews, New Brunswick, in 1786. (A.O 13/50.) The three brother claimed L657 1s, and were allowed L50 each. (A.O. 12/109.) According to Sabine, Jonathan died in 1818, aged 80; Ebenezer about 1810, aged 70; and Charles about 1810, aged 70, all at St Andrews.
    • Biographical sketches of loyalists of the American Revolution with an historical essay
      Lorenzo Sabine.
      1864 Little, Brown and Company
      Boston

      p 498
      GREENLAW, Charles. Of Castine, Maine. Brother of Ebenezer. He accompanied Jonathan and Ebenezer to St Andrew, where he settled, and died in 1811, aged about sixty-eight.
    • Canada, Loyalist Claims, 1776-1835
      Name: Jonathan Greenlaw
      Residence Year: 1786 - 1788
      Previous Residence Place: Deer Island
      Record Type: Memorial
      Piece Description: Evidence
      US Region: Massachusetts Bay
      The National Archives of the UK; Kew, Surrey, England; American Loyalist Claims, 1776-1835; Class: AO 13; Piece: 011.
      p 57
      (New claim)
      To the Commissioners appointed by Act of Parliament for enquiring into the Losses and Services of the American Loyalists
      The Memorial of Jonathan, Ebenezer and Alexander Greenlaw
      Humbly Sheweth
      That your Memorialists had formerly taken up Lands on Deer Island near Penobscot, on which they had made great Improvements (besides clearing thirty acres for their aged Parents who died ten years ago) tho they had no Title from the Crown to hold those Lands being prevented by the War from obtaining it.
      That they were always esteemed Loyal Subjects, and when the British Troops took Post at Penobscot, they with another Brother went and took the Oath of allegiance before General McLean who permitted them to return to their Families. That this proceeding gave great offence to their Rebel Neighbors. On the arrival of the Rebel Force against the Fort your Memorialists finding it impossible to give their assistance to the British retired into the Woods for a time, and after returning home were advised to go up and satisfy the Rebel Commadore that they were not in the Fort and thereby save their Property. That on their wy up for that Purpose with their other Brother in a Vessel of their own they were taken by the Rebel Brig Pallas, and were treated with every Indignity by the Crew who made a Prize of their Vessel, plundered their Farms, frightened and abused their Families, and carried your Memorialists to the Commadore, who ordered them to be closely confined on board of different ships where they were abused in a most inhuman manner, insomuch that their Brother Charles is at time bereft of his Sences. That after the Siege your Memorialists returned home, and as the place was under Subjection to the British two of them remained upon their Farms until the Evacuation, when knowing it would not be possible to live in peace under the Rebel Government removed to St Andrews, but previous to his coming away Ebenezer disposed of his Farm for an invaluable Consideration which has not yet been fully made, rather than lose his whole Improvement.
      That Jonathan Greenlaw removed his Family to Penobscot where he built a House which at the Evacuation he took to Pieces and brought with him to St Andrews at a great Expence.
      Your Memorialists therefore having stated their Cases beg your Honors will be pleased at attend to their Claims which are hereto annexed, and as each of them has a large Family and His Majesty's allowance of Provisions is almost at an end, the smallest Compensation will be accepted with Gratitude.
      And your Memorialists etc.
      St Andrews April 1786

      p 115
      Losses Sustained by Jonathan Greenlaw during the late unhappy dissentions in America in consequence of his Loyalty to His Majesty and attachment to the British Government for which he craves Compensation.

      1/4 part of a small Schooner, Salt & Provision Clothing and other necessaries taken by the Pallas brig....10 - -
      2 Cows @L5 - 30 Sheep @ 15/ L22 10....32 10 -
      1 young Ox L8 3 one Quarter Beef @ 20/....9 3 -
      60 lb Pork L1 10 Six Cheeses L4 60....6 6 -
      2 Quintals Codfish....@ 15/....4 10 -
      2 Muskets L2 one pair Silver Buckles 35/....3 15 -
      2 Silver Spoons 5/ four Dollars 20/....1 5 -
      8 yards Cloth 24/ four new Sheets 40/....3 4 -
      Wearing apparel....13 18 -
      Household Furniture....- 17 -
      Clearing 10 acres of Land for my Parents (since dead) @ 20 Dollars per acre....50 - -
      Loss in taking down a House and bringing it to St Andrews....20 - -

      Halifax Currency 165 8 -
      Diffce of Currency 16 10 9
      Sterling 148 7 3

      p 116
      Account of Losses sustained by Ebenezer Greenlaw during the late unhappy Dissentions, and for which he craves Relief.
      1/4 part of a Schooner....L20 - -
      2 Cows L10 five Sheep L3 15....13 15 -
      3 Cheeses 30/...7 lb Butter 10/....2 - -
      Vegetables L5. 2 Tons Hay L7 10....12 10 -
      12 lb Flour 5/. 1 Gun - Lines, Leads & Hooks 45/....2 10 -
      40 Acres of land cleared in Mowing Pasture and planting with an Orchard of 80 young Apple Trees @ 20 Dollars per acres....200 - -
      1 Dwelling House and Barn....15 - -
      250 Acres of Wood Land @ 10/....125 - -
      Clearing 10 Acres of Land for his Parents who are since deceased....50 - -
      1 Crow Bar 20/ - 40 lb Flax 25/....2 5 -
      Potatoes and other Roots taken after he fled with his Family to Penobscot....15 - -
      458 - -
      Deduct 40 ? Boards@ 30/ which he was obliged to take for his Farm & possessions or lose the whole....60 - -
      Halifax Currency....398 - -
      Exchange 1/10....39 4 -
      Sterling L 358 16 -

      p 117
      Losses sustained by Alexander Greenlaw during the late unhappy Dissentions in American etc etc for which he solicits Relief
      1/4th Part of a Fishing Schooner./...L20 - -
      1 Cow L5. Sow and 7 Pigs L3....8 - -
      12 bushels Corn @ 5/. 3 Bushels Pease @ 7/6....4 2 6
      Wearing Apparel....7 6 -
      1 Ring, 1 pair Sleeve Buttons and breach....1 5 -
      7 Dollars L1 150 Furniture L3....4 13 -
      6 Cheeses L3. 6 Sheep L4 10....7 10 -
      1 Barrel Salt 20/. Line Lead & Hooks 17/....1 17 -
      12 Bushels Potatoes 30/ a pot Butter 6/....1 16 -
      Clearing 10 Acres Land for his Parents who are since dead @ 20 Dollars per Acre....50 - -
      Loss in selling a Farm 40 Acres Cleared....50 - -
      Another Farm containing 80 Acres....10 - -
      Halifax Currency....L166 11 6
      Difference of Exchange....16 13 1
      Sterling....L149 18 5

      p 118
      St John 22d March 1787
      Evidence on the Claim of Jonathan Greenlaw, late of Massachusetts.
      Claimant Sworn
      Says he lived at Deer Island before the War, went to Penobscot, staid 2 years, went away on the Evacuation to St Andrews. Had no opportunity of sending his Claim home from St Andrews. Knew of no vessel going to England.
      He came into the Garrison at Penobscot under General McLean, lived there for Protection, went in in the Fall after the Siege, He had been in Irons because he would not serve the Rebel Army.
      He served the last War with General Amherst. He had petitioned for lands in Deer Island but had no Grant. Dr Califf was to have got his Grants. Had began an Improvement.
      His father and all his Children settled there above 20 years ago, it was then a new Country.
      Claimant had 300 acres, had built an House and cleared 40 Acres.
      Lost two Cows, one Ox, Thirty Sheep Cloathes and Furniture.
      p 119
      When Penobscot was besieged the Rebels came and took these Things because they would not join them.
      There was a Schooner belonging to himself and three Brother. Claimant was entitled to 1/4th. She was seized by the Rebels.

      Ebenezer Greenlaw Sworn
      Says his Brother's Lands were seized for a Debt.

      p 120
      St John 22d March 1787
      Evidence of the Claim of Ebenezer Greenlaw
      Claimant Sworn
      Gives the same account as his Brother that they had no opportunity of sending their Claims to England.
      He was settled on Deer Island in the years 1761.
      Was taken by the Rebels and put in Irons because he would not serve with them at the Siege of Penobscot. After that came in to the British, confined there a twelvemonth, returned to Deer Island, but came away to St Andrews about the time of the Evacuation of Penobscot.
      Served during the last War in His Majesty's Service he and five brother.
      He had 300 Acres, 40 acres clear, built a House and Barn.
      Sold it in 1783 before he came away for Boards Value about L60.
      Lost 1/4th part Schooner with Salt etc values his Share at L.20 Value Ship alone at 75 Dollars.
      Cow, five Sheep, Hay, Potatoes, taken by the Rebels because they would not Serve.

      p 121
      Claimant says he and his Brothers had been particularly obnoxious by carrying General McLean's Proclamations thro the Country.
      His Father had 300 acres which came amongst three Sons. Values the Wild Lands at one Dollar per Acre. Cultivated at 20 Dollars.

      p 122
      St John 23d March 1787
      Evidence on the Claim of Alexr Greenlaw
      Claimant Sworn
      Says he went with his Father and Brothers to settled on Deer Island many years ago. Parted with his Lands for a quarters of its Value.
      His Father had 300 acres which came on his death amongst his three Sons who had supported him and done Work. Near 20 Acres of this Father's Land clear.
      Lost a Cow, some Corn in the House, Furniture, Provisions, Utensils, taken by the Rebels on account of his having refused to serve with them.
      Claimant was imprisoned and in Irons during the Siege, his Life was threaten'd if he did not agree to their Measures.
      Doctor Califf Sworn
      Says the three Greenlaws went to St Andrews in September 1782, Witness left them there, thinks no Ship went that Winter from St Andrews for England. They carried some Stock, but Witness understood they had lost some before which had been taken from their Farms on Deer Island.
      They are all three very Loyal and industrious Settlers.

      p 123
      He was at their Settlements, they seemed to have each a considerable Stock and very good Improvements.
      As soon as the Siege of Penobscot began they were taken Prisoners by the Rebels, and kept in Irons as they refused to join the Rebels.
      After they came in to Penobscot, they were enlisted in Nathan Philips Compy.



      Canada, Loyalist Claims, 1776-1835
      Name: Jonathan Greenlaw
      Residence Year: 1782 - 1783
      Record Type: Minutes
      Piece Description: Minute Book
      The National Archives of the UK; Kew, Surrey, England; American Loyalist Claims, 1776-1835; Class: AO 13; Piece: 098.
      p 324
      Thursday 22d March 1787
      Present
      Both the Commissioners
      Have the Memorials of James Brittain, Sarah Grant Widow, Thomas Walker, Northrope Marple, John Heard, Ebenezer Greenlaw, Jonathan Greenlaw, Peter Partior, Matthew Lymburner, and Jonathan Munday and examined the Evidences thereon

      Determined in the Claim of Stephen Thorne.
      Hear the Memorial of Mary, Samuel & Charles Henry Chander for Temporary Support and determined thereon

      Ordered that the Decision Cotransmitted to the Lord of the Treasury.
      Adjourned till Tomorrow
      at 10 o'Clock

      p 325
      Friday 23d March 1787
      Present
      Both the commissioners
      Heard the Memorials of Alexander Greenlaw, Samuel Mallows, and Seth Squier, and examined the Evidences thereon.
      Heard further Evidence in the Cases of William Domayne, and Thomas Gummersall, and William Wright.
      Determined on the Claim of Jame Cable.
      Adjourned till Tomorrow
      at 10 o'Clock
    • http://members.shaw.ca/caren.secord/locations/NewBrunswick/Lists/PenobscotGroupSorted.html
      Return of Men, Women and Children of the Penobscot Loyalists Settled in the District of Passamaquoddy the 10th of June 1784
      Men: Jonn Greenlaw, Alexr Greenlaw, Ebenr Greenlaw

      Women: Eunice Greenlaw, Eliz. Greenlaw, Hannah Greenlaw, Rebecca Greenlaw

      Children above 10: Abigail Greenlaw, Ebenr Greenlaw, Elijah Greenlaw, Eliz. Greenlaw, Eliz. Greenlaw, Hanh Greenlaw, James Greenlaw, Jean Greenlaw, John Greenlaw, Jonn Greenlaw, Jonn Greenlaw, Lucy Greenlaw, Richd Greenlaw, Thos Greenlaw, Walter Greenlaw, Wm Greenlaw, Wm Greenlaw

      Children under 10: Abigail Greenlaw, Ebenezer Greenlaw, Eliz. Greenlaw, Eunice Greenlaw, Jane Greenlaw, Joanna Greenlaw, John Greenlaw, John Greenlaw, Rebecca Greenlaw, Sarah Greenlaw, William Greenlaw, Wm Greenlaw 3d

      By Family-Theoretical
      Men: Jonn Greenlaw [10 children]
      Women: Eliz. Greenlaw
      Children above 10: Wm Greenlaw, Jonn Greenlaw, Thos Greenlaw, Richd Greenlaw, James Greenlaw
      Children under 10: Ebenr Greenlaw, Eliz. Greenlaw, Rebecca Greenlaw, Sarah Greenlaw, Jane Greenlaw

      Men: Ebenr Greenlaw [10 children]
      Women: Eunice Greenlaw
      Children above 10: Elijah Greenlaw, Eliz. Greenlaw, Wm Greenlaw, Jonn Greenlaw, Lucy Greenlaw, Ebenezer Greenlaw
      Children under 10: John Greenlaw, Joanna Greenlaw, Eunice Greenlaw, Abigail Greenlaw

      Men: Alexr Greenlaw [6 children]
      Women: Hannah Greenlaw
      Children above 10: Jean Greenlaw, Walter Greenlaw, Eliz. Greenlaw, Abigail Greenlaw, Hanh Greenlaw
      Children under 10: William Greenlaw

      Men: [William Greenlaw] [2 children]
      Women: Rebecca Greenlaw
      Children under 10: John Greenlaw, Wm Greenlaw 3d

      Total Greenlaws: 36 [3 men, 4 women, 29 children]

      There is a spare John Greenlaw [aged 10 and over] who must belong to either the family of Jonathan or the family of Alexander. Is he the son of William Greenlaw m Elizabeth Fosset? Is he a son of Charles Greenlaw m Mercy Hawthorne?
    • https://books.google.com/books?id=UUUsGkMSq24C&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false
      An Historical Sketch of the Town of Deer Isle, Maine
      George Lawrence Hosmer
      Press of Stanley and Usher. Boston. 1886

      p 19
      Jonathan Greenlaw, who came as early as 1762 or 1762, one of the family of that name who came shortly after, and next to William Eaton, the first settler, gave a deed to Kent of a tract of land containing a mile square, in consideration of the erection and maintenance of a grist-mill.

      p 43
      Greenlaw - The next persons who came were five by the name of Greenlaw. They settled on Campbell's Neck, and the farm of Mr Samuel W Campbell, and that of Mr William Foster's heirs - in all about five hundred acres. Their names were Jonathan, Charles, Alexander, Ebenezer, and William, and whether they were all brothers or not, I do not know. They were natives of Scotland, and had emigrated from that country not long before, and were endeavoring to find a place to settled upon with which they might be suited. The places they took up did so, and they commenced settlements. After the occupation of Bagaduce by the British in 1779, they made frequent visits there, as they were zealous loyalists, and were suspected of carrying information - a cause of displeasure to their neighbors, who almost all were friendly to the American cause. They were the persons before spoken of as going with the British in 1783 to the Provinces, where they settled, and their descendants still reside there. Some time after, two of the sons of Mr Jonathan Greenlaw, Messrs William and Richard Greenlaw, came back and remained will their deaths. They were brought back by the brothers in law of Mr William Greenlaw - Messrs Joseph Whitmore and Captain Seth Hatch - who went after them in a vessel.

      p 51
      Mr [William] Foster settled upon a part of the land formerly occupied by the Greenlaw family, but whether he came here before they left or not is not known to us, but as he had a two hundred acre lot it is probable that he purchased the rights of one of them at least, which with his own would entitle him to that quantity.

      p 52
      [John Campbell was a large landed proprietor, owning one lot of two hundred acres, another known as the Campbell's Neck lot of 77, and the island near known as Campbell's Island, of 88 acres, and it is probable that he purchased the rights of some of the Greenlaw family, as he would of his own right be entitled to but 100 acres.

      p 61
      William Greenlaw was the first settler near what is called Fish Creek. He was the son of Mr Jonathan Greenlaw, mentioned before, who went with the British to New Brunswick in 1783. As before stated, the subject of this sketch returned with his brother Richard. The wife of Mr Greenlaw was Miss Rebecca Babbidge, a daughter of Mr William Babbidge; and at the time of their marriage there was no person qualified to solemnize marriages nearer than Bagaduce, where the chaplain to the garrison officiated. The person who performed the duties of chaplain, as well as surgeon, was Dr John Calef, a refugee from Massachusetts, in which State he was born, in Ipswich; and when the troops evacuated the place, he went with them into the Province of New Brunswick, where he lived the remainder of his days. Mr Greenlaw was married in 1780, and he and Mr Joseph Whitmore, with their intended wives, who were sisters, went there for the purpose, and they were both joined in marriage on the same day. Mr Greenlaw and wife were the parents of 10 sons and 1 daughter, who lived to manhood and womanhood. The eldest of the sons was William, who was lost at sea on a whaling voyage, when a young man. The second son was the late Captain John Greenlaw, who was a capable and intelligent master-mariner, who died in 1870, at the age of 87 years, after having lived with his wife in wedlock 66 years. He was the father of the present Captain Jeremiah H, Ebenezer, and William Greenlaw. Another son was Mr James Greelaw, who was drowned not far from 1830, leaving a family. Anotehr was Captain Jonathan Greenlaw, who removed to Eatport, out of which place he sailed many years. Another was the late Captain Richard Greenlaw, the father of the present Mr Thomas R Greenlaw. Another was Thomas Greenlaw, who was drowned when a young man. Another was Mr Ebenezer Greenlaw, the father of the present Mr Eben Greenlaw 2d. Another was the late Captain Walter Greenlaw, well known in his day, who died at sea in about the year 1847. Another is the present Levi Greenlaw, the sole survivor, at te age of 79 years in 1882. And the other was the late Mr William Greenlaw. The daughter was the wife of Mr Daniel C Copp, who removed from this place to Castine, who was by trade a ship carpenter and joiner, and from Castine he removed to the city of Ellsworth, where he died.

      About this family there was one singularity; of the 10 sons there were 5 who could use no food or drink in which there was anything sweet, operating upon them as an emetic; while upon the remaining 5 it had no such effect. Mr Greenlaw was one of whom every one who knew him spoke in praise, as a quiet, honest, and upright man. The land occupied by him was not a part of that taken up by his father and uncles, as that passed into other hands; but as he was here so early, he was entitled to a settler's right, and the place is still the property of his descendants.

      p 142
      Richard Greenlaw was the youngest son of Mr Jonathan Greenlaw, who settled here shortly after William Eaton and went when a child to New Brunswick with his father in 1783, but returned with his brother William. He was not the owner of any real estate, we think, but resided upon the farm of his son during the later years of his life. His wife was Miss Mary Jordan, a daughter of Mrs James Jordan, and he was by trade a ship-carpenter. Their sons were: Richard, who removed to the town of Kilmarnock, Maine, which is now called Medford. Another was the late Mr James J Greenlaw. Another was the present Mr Joseph S Greenlaw. Another was Mr Samuel J Greenlaw. Another was Mr William L Greenlaw, who resides in Newburyport. Another was Mr John C J Greenlaw, who died many years ago. The daughter were the wives of Mr George Barbour and Mr Thomas V Howard; and two live in Massachusetts.
    • Hancock County Land Records

      https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/334690?availability=Family%20History%20Library
      Deeds 1791-1861; index 1791-1864
      Authors: Hancock County (Maine). Register of Deeds
      Deeds v. 3-4, 1794-1797
      Family History Library
      United States & Canada Film
      10948
      7834660
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/007834660?cat=334690
      Volume 3 Page 48
      [31/596]
      Jonathan Greenlaw, Charles Greenlaw, Alexander Greenlaw yeomen Saint Andrews heirs of William Greenlaw late of Deer Isle deceased
      John Campbell yeoman Deer Isle
      60 pounds
      100 acres on Deer Isle original settlement of our aforesaid Honoured Father William Greenlaw deceased
      lying eastwardly on the Sea shore
      southwardly by Mark Haskell and Son's Land
      westwardly on commonland
      northwardly by land lately owned and possessed by Jonathan Greenlaw
      42 rods wide
      29 September 1789
      Jonathan Greenlaw
      Marey Greenlaw
      Ebenezer Greenlaw
      Aleander Greenlaw
      Wit: Peter Powers, Geo Tyler, William Greenlaw, Nathl Hamlett
    • American Migrations 1765-1799, Coldham, Peter Wilson
      p 37
      Greenlaw, Ebenezer of Penobscot. He was settled on Deer Island in 1761 and served with his five brother during the French War. At the beginning of he rebellion he was taken by the rebels and put in irons because he would not join them in the siege of Penobscot. After coming within British lines for a year, he returned to Deer Island but, when Penobscot was evacuated, came away to St Andrews, NB. His father divided his estate between three of his sons. Claims for a fishing schooner part owned with Jonathan and Alexander Greenlaw; a house and 40 acres; 250 acres of woodland.

      Greenlaw, Jonathan & Alexander of Penobscot. Memorial, St Andrews, NB, 1786. They are two of four brothers who, with their brother Charles Greenlaw, took up lands on Deer Island near Penobscot and cleared 30 acres. When the British came there they all took the oath of allegiance to the Crown and, on the coming of the rebels, the four brothers were drived into the woods before trying to escape on their own vessel, the Egamagan. They were intercepted by the rebel brig Pallas flying British colours and were schackled hand and foot to the deck while their estate was plundered. They were so badly abused that their brother Charles is not sometimes out of his senses. Ebenezer Greenlaw had disposed of his estate but at a small consideration. Jonathan Greenlaw, when Penobscot was evacuated, took his house to pieces and brought it with him to St Andrews. Claim for a small schooner with cargo of salt & provisions; pork, fish, etc. Account [undated] of the Sufferings of Ebenezer Greenlaw.

  • Sources 
    1. [S3975] Loyalists to Canada: The 1783 Settlement of Quakers and Others at Passamaquoddy, Theodore C Holmes, (Picton Press 1992).