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Richard TURNER

Richard TURNER

Male - 1796

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  • Name Richard TURNER 
    Born Yorkshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • "A History of Whitefield Maine" by Rundlette Kensall Palmer, quoting Turner genealogy.
    Gender Male 
    Birth 1714 
    • Turner History via A History of Whitefield Maine by Rundlette Kensell Palmer
    Residence 11 Nov 1737  Barnacre, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Immigration 1774 
    Residence 1775  above Kings Mills (Whitefield), Balltown, Lincoln, ME Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • History of Whitefield
      They came further up the river than any previous settlers, and located on its western bank upon a tract of land one mile in width, which extended northward three miles from a line about one half mile above Kings Mills (Whitefield).

      Ballstown-West
      p 12a
      Shows land surveyed for Richard Turner 1775 on the west side of the Sheepscot. Perhaps encompassing in the Scammon Plan from Jonathan Clark 45.5 acres/Samuel Kincaid, north to, say, Thomas Sweat 124 acres.
    Residence 13 Sep 1777  Balltown, Lincoln, ME Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Massachusetts State Archives Collection
      Volume 322 Page 180
      Bawltown letter dated 13 September 1777

      A list of the men's names in the Plantation of Bawltown [Balltown, Whitefield/Jefferson] from sixteen years and upwards agreeable to an act of Cort [sic] December 9th 1776

      Mecres Carr Capt
      Joshua Little 1st Lieut
      Benjn King 2nd Lieut
      Ephraim Brown Sergt
      Jonathan Bartlett [Sergt]
      Jacob Rowel [Sergt]
      James Murphy [Sergt]
      Samuell Parmer Corpl [Palmer?]
      Samuell Whitman [Corpl]
      Timothy Ferrin [Corpl]
      Thomas Grover [Corpl]

      Petter Dow
      Solln Clark
      Wllm Boynton
      Saml Bawl [Ball]
      John Boynton
      Jeri Brand [Bran, Brann]
      Isaac Brand
      Stephen Belden
      Thoms Cunningham
      Moses Cooper
      Thoms Day
      John Decker
      John Fish
      John Philbrook [Philbrick]
      Ebenezr Philbrook
      Jonathn Philbrook
      Andrew Gledden [Glidden]
      Arnold Gledden
      Asse Heath
      Saml Jonson [Johnson]

      Joseph Rogers
      James Reves [Reeves, Reaves]
      James Turner
      James Shepard
      John Duely [Dooley]
      Ebenez Grover
      Benjn Dow
      Charles Gledden
      Enoch Averil
      Caleb Bartlet [Bartlett]
      Leonard Cooper
      Caleb Conselis?
      Patrick Fallon
      Jonas Jonston Davis
      James Emery
      Stephen Grover
      Davi Huchens [Hutchins, Hitchings]
      Jonathan Heath
      Isaac Heath
      Daniel Lumber? [Plummer?]
      Nathan Longfello [Longfellow]
      [Jeremiah?] Norris
      Jonthn? Peaslee
      Oliver Peaslee
      Ezekiel Peaslee
      ? ?z? [Jonathan Noyes? Thomas Trask?]
      ?

      Ezekiel Sterns [Stearns]
      Thomas Turner
      Nicklas Turner
      Jonah Vining
      John Woodman Senr
      Ralph Chiney [Cheney]
      Willm Carr
      John Woodman Junr
      Abner Ford
      Ebenezer Philbrook
      Jonathan Bartlet
      Michael Gledden
      Joseph Bartlett
      Benj Kinney [Kenney]
      Joshua Chamberlin [Chamberlain]
      Richard Turner

      Mecres Carr Capt
      Joshua Littl Lieut
      Benjn King Lieut
      Benjn Stickney Clerk
    Residence 19 Mar 1779  [Balltown, Lincoln, ME] Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • https://archive.org/stream/collectionsofpro02prot#page/328/mode/2up

      The frontier missionary : a memoir of the life of the Rev. Jacob Bailey, A.M., missionary at Pownalborough, Maine; Cornwallis and Annapolis, N. S.; with illustrations, notes, and an appendix
      by Bartlet, William S. (William Stoodley), 1809-1883; Protestant Episcopal Historical Society
      Publication date 1853
      p 354
      [1779] 19th [March] Rode to Mr R Turner's. Tarried all night.
      20th. Rode home.
    Residence 1790  with Thomas? Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Died 1796  Balltown, Lincoln, ME Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Turner History via A History of Whitefield Maine by Rundlette Kensell Palmer
    Person ID I38916  4 February 2018
    Last Modified 23 May 2020 

    Family Eleanor COWELL,   b. Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1790 
    Married 11 Nov 1737  Garstang, St Helen, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    • Richard Turner
      in the Lancashire, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812
      Name: Richard Turner
      Marriage Date: 11 Nov 1737
      Parish: Garstang, St Helen, Lancashire, England
      Phillimore Ecclesiastical Parish Maps:
      View this parish
      Spouse's Name: Ellen Cowell
      Register Type: Parish Register
      Reference Number: PR 2405
      Ancestry.com. Lancashire, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812 [database on-line]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.

      November 1737
      ...
      Mr Richard Turner and Ellin Cowell both of Barnaker Mard the Eleventh Day pr Banns


      Richard Turner
      in the Lancashire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812
      Name: Richard Turner
      Marriage Date: 11 Nov 1737
      Parish: Garstang, Lancashire, England
      Phillimore Ecclesiastical Parish Maps:
      View this parish
      Spouse's name: Elling Conell
      [Elling Cowell]
      Register Type: Bishops Transcripts
      Reference Number: Drb 2/77
      Ancestry.com. Lancashire, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812 [database on-line]. Provo, UT: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012.
      Marriages in Novembr 1737
      Richard Turner and Elling Cowell boath of Barnaker Pr Pub
    Children 
     1. Ellen TURNER,   b. 1740
     2. William TURNER,   b. 1740?,   d. 1775?
     3. Thomas TURNER,   b. Barnacre, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1829
     4. James TURNER,   b. Barnacre, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1823, Saint Patrick, Charlotte, NB Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Elizabeth TURNER,   b. 1747,   d. 1776, Balltown, Lincoln, ME Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 29 years)
     6. Anthony TURNER,   b. Barnacre, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1777?
     7. Henry TURNER,   b. Claughton, Lancashire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1777?
     8. Margaret TURNER,   b. 1752,   d. Bef 1850 CENSUS
     9. Eleanor TURNER,   b. 2 Feb 1753,   d. 8 Feb 1821  (Age 68 years)
     10. Nicholas TURNER,   b. *[1751-1755],   d. Bef 1840 CENSUS
     11. Mary TURNER,   b. 1757,   d. 1 Nov 1814  (Age 57 years)
    Family ID F11420  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Balltown Loyalists Map Schematic
    Balltown Loyalists Map Schematic

  • Notes 
    • Caren Secord: Nil
      Maine Wills: Nil
      UEL: Nil
      Census 1790: with son Thomas?
      Lincoln County Probate: Nil
      Loyalist Claims: Nil
      Lincoln County Court of General Sessions: Volume 1 Page 162 [366/1111] 1778 Sarah Turner fornication [d Nehemiah Turner m Lois Hutchins]
      Balltown 1777: James Turner, Thomas Turner, Nicholas Turner, Richard Turner
      Liberty Men: Nil
      Me Soldiers and Sailors Revolutionary: Nil

      1000 acres surveyed for Richard Turner in 1775 on the west side of the Sheepscot: From No 28 147 a D F Crowell through about Thomas Sweet 114 a
    • The Turner Family 1894
      [As reprinted in "A History of Whitefield Maine" by Rundelett Kensell Palmer]

      Early in the last century an Englishman, Turner by name, who had just buried his young wife, left his infant daughter with friends in Yorkshire County, England, and went on a journey to Ireland. There he remained for some years, marrying and becoming the father of several children. Whether his wife was an Irish woman is not known, but as the family possessed no characteristics of that race, and were moreover Protestants of the Church of England, it may be doubted.

      This man was the first ancestor of whom we have any account; but it is only reasonable to suppose that the genealogy extends backward as far as that of others better known, even to Adam and Eve.

      After the birth of the fifth child this Mr Turner started to return to England to dispose of his estate there, in order to make permanent home in Ireland, but was never heard of afterwards. It was always believed by his family that he was robbed and murdered on the way. The wife, after waiting in wain for tidings of him, took her three sons and two daughters and went to England to live.

      Later on, about the year 1741, Richard, one of these sons, married Eleanor, called Nelly, Cowel, whose family belonged to the gentry of the adjoining county of Lanchashire, and from them she received a yearly allowance or dowery until her death. This accumulated to such a sum after they had been in this country for some years that her son Thomas went over to the old home for it, in a sailing vessel of course, being absent six months.

      In 1774 Richard and Eleanor Turner with six children, Thomas, James, Nicholas, Betsey, Mary and Margaret, one of the sons having previously visited the country, came to America, leaving behind one daughter married to John Brownrigg. They were attracted to the Sheepscot region by its immense growth of pine timber, although their lifelong friend Mr Vaughn, who came over in the same ship with them, settled on the Kennebec in Hallowell. They came farther up the river than any previous settlers, and located on its western bank upon a tract of land one mile in width, which extended northward three miles from a line about 1/2 mile above Kings Mills, Whitefield. They were at that time possessed of an ample fortune. Here, not far from the river, near a fine spring of water which now supplies the Kensell farm buildings, they erected a large colonial house, planted an orchard, of which one tree still bears fruit, and afterwards built a saw mill upon the river.

      This was just as the Revolutionary storm burst upon the country, and to escape the persecution then raging against all suspected Tories, and to avoid taking up arms against the beloved native land which they had just quitted and which contained all their near kindred, Thomas, James, then married to Rachel Sylvester of Wiscasset, their brother in law, and others, left for the British Provinces where they arrived after great hardship and from whence three of them never returned to stay. It is only just to state here that all the chldren of Thomas Turner, who always held their father in the greatest veneration, asserted positively that he never by words or deed gave the least assistance to the loyalists, and that after peace was established he was always true to his chosen country.

      Nicholas, third son of Richard, married Betsey Gray of Wiscasset, and built a house, also in colonial style, on his part of the estate, known as the Tavern House, situated on Tavern Hill near a brook of that name. Before his death he divided his land equally among his eight children, and a large part of it is still occupied by his descendants. Of all these there are but three who bear the family name, Albert, a grandson of Nicholas, who went to California in forty nine and has always lived there, and his two sons Bert and Harry. Their mother was Caroline W Preble of Whitefield.

      James Turner settled in or near St Andrews, NB, and it is not known that any of his twelve children ever resided in the United States, with the exception of Rev Edward Turner, a Baptist preacher, who at one time lived in Maine.

      The daughter, Betsey, who had been married to Richard Cookson in Cumberland Co, England, died after arriving here, leaving four children; Mary a rigid church woman was married to John Bailey of Pittston in 1779, and Margaret became the wife of Martin Carlo in 1781.

      Richard Turner was born in 1714, and died in 1796, Eleanor Cowel, his wife, died in 1790.

      Thomas Turner returned from St Andrews some time after the close of the war and settled upon the homestead in Whitefield. He has often been described to the writer of this sketch as a man very large in stature, of great strength and wonderful voice, of so great a reputation for honesty that his word was as good as his bond, and made him the easy victim of unscrupulous men. He was always unfortunate in money matters. For example, his children used to relate that their father once invested as much specie as he could carry in two bags upon his back in two vessels which sailed away and were never heard of afterwards; also, that he once paid a man seventy seven pounds sterling in advance to finish his parlor, but the man took the money and left and was never seen there again; and other like things for which there is no space in this paper.

      At the age of forty he married Sally Achorn of Waldoboro, whose family was among the original German settlers of that town. She entertained great pride of birth and constantly instilled into the minds of her children and grandchildren the fact of their descent from a prince of royal blood, disinherited for marrying a daughter of the people. The true name of this man who left a high station and came to the wilds of America all for love, "love that makes the world go round," is not known to us. He was still living when Margaret, the eldest grandchild in the Turner family, was old enough to remember something of his appearance and she described him as a man of noble presence, very tall, with piercing black eyes.

      [Possibly the same author as "Historical Sketch of the Family of Thomas Turner Eldest Son of Richard Turner One of the First Settlers of Whitefield, Maine." Eglantine Turner Preble. Read at the Turner Family Reunion at North Whitefield 26 November 1894. Published by the Press of A M Chase & Co, Bryant Pond, Maine]
    • Ballstown-West 1768-1809
      An Introduction to the history of the town of Whitefield, Maine
      Linwood H Lowden
      1984
      p 17
      Turner
      In 1775 Nehemiah Blodgett surveyed a one-thousand-acre tract of land for Richard Turner. This tract stretched for more than a mile and a half along the west bank of the Sheepscot River, reaching from just north of William Bell's home to just south of the townhouse. Richard was born in England in 1714 and came to America in 1774 with his wife Eleanor and six chidlren. He is said to have built a large colonial style house at the site of David Chase's home [150 Town House Road. Apparently Harriman Lot No 18]. This building was later taken down and the present structure built in its place. His third son, Nicholas, built a colonial style tavern just north of the Philbrick Road and on the east side of the Townshouse Road. This tavern was located on the rise of land above Tavern Brook. This building has long since been removed.

      Richard was a Tory and removed to Canada with several of his family. Some of his family did not return. He and his son, Thomas, did return to live on the homestead. Nicholas Turner was also a long time resident of this town.

      p 47
      Turner Preble Mills
      Soon after coming to Whitefield in 1775 Richard Turner is said to have built a sawmill about one mile above the Great Falls. Turner's mill was on the west side of the river near where Tavern Brook [across from Philbrick Lane under Townhouse Road] flows into the Sheepscot. There was a mill yard and a road giving access to Townhouse Road. In 1800 this mill was described as being near the home of Thomas Turner. Thomas at that time appears to have been living just north of Tavern Brook where Turner's Tavern is said to have stood. Thomas and his brother Nicholas exchanged this point of land more than once.
    • History of Dresden, Maine
      Charles E Allen
      1931
      p 399
      Letter from Jacob Bailey 10 July 1779 To General McLean at Majabaggaduce
      "List of those persons within the compass of my knowledge who may be depended upon as loyal subjects"
      Pownalborough
      including
      Richard Turner
      Nicholas Turner
      Jacob Carlo
      Christopher Turner
    • https://archive.org/stream/collectionsofpro02prot#page/328/mode/2up

      The frontier missionary : a memoir of the life of the Rev. Jacob Bailey, A.M., missionary at Pownalborough, Maine; Cornwallis and Annapolis, N. S.; with illustrations, notes, and an appendix
      by Bartlet, William S. (William Stoodley), 1809-1883; Protestant Episcopal Historical Society
      Publication date 1853
      p 354
      [1778] 10th [February] At Carlo's and Johnson's. Baptized Hannah Turner.
      p 354
      [1778] 9th [January] Baptized Mary Silvester and Mary, children of James and Rachel Turner. Returned home same day.
      p 354
      [1778] 8th [January] Rode to Mr Richard Turner's. Found his son Thomas sick of a fever.
    • https://familysearch.org/search/film/007703444?cat=1055547
      Town and vital records, 1739-1929
      Authors: Wiscasset (Maine). Town Clerk
      Intentions of marriage 1760-1813, family records listing births and deaths, deaths 1761-1814, ear marks, strays, pew deeds, warnings out of town, proceedings of town meetings, voting, roads, real estate, marriages 1760-1794, school district records.
      Family History Library
      United States & Canada Film
      12309
      7596937
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/007596937?cat=339395
      [20/536]
      James Preble of Pownalborough and Martha Turner of New Castle October 20 1776 [Publishment]
    • Index to New Brunswick Land Grants, 1784 - 1997 (RS686)
      Name TURNER, Samuel
      Volume NS-A
      Page 165
      Grant number 95
      Place Saint Andrews
      County Sunbury
      Date 1785-05-21
      Accompanying plan No
      Acres 0
      Microfilm F16302
      Comment Re-registered NS Grant of 1784/06/01: Town Lot
      Other names on this grant (354)

      Index to New Brunswick Land Grants, 1784 - 1997 (RS686)
      Name TURNER, Samuel
      Volume NS-A
      Page 176
      Grant number 96
      Place Passamaquoddy
      County Sunbury
      Date 1785-05-21
      Accompanying plan No
      Acres 100
      Microfilm F16302
      Comment Re-registered NS Grant of 1784/08/03: Penobscot Association
      Other names on this grant (188):
    • Lincoln County Registry Books -1800 Richard Turner and sons grantor/grantee. 1800-1810 grantors

      General Index for grantotors T starts at [312/463] for 1800-.

      https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/352440?availability=Family%20History%20Library
      Land records, 1761-1912; indexes to land records, 1761-1901
      Authors: Lincoln County (Maine). Register of Deeds
      Index to v. 7-187 M-Y 1769-1848
      Family History Library
      United States & Canada Film
      11356
      7834677
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/007834677?cat=352440
      [293/463]
      Volume 16 Page 290
      John Neilson to Thomas & Richard Turner 290
      Land records v. 16-17 1782-1785 (the first titleboard on this film is incorrectly labeled "v. 15")
      Family History Library
      United States & Canada Film
      11366
      8181957
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/008181957?cat=352440
      [252/567]
      John Nielson yeoman Warren
      Richard Turner and Thomas Turner yeomen of a Place on Sheepscutt River but not in any Town
      400 pounds
      quit claim
      land in Warren
      7 April 1794
      John Nielson
      Wit: David Vinal, David Murray

      Richard Turner his Plan Volume 16 Page 320


      Richard Turner to Nicholas Turner 116
      Land records v. 26-27 1790-1791
      Family History Library
      United States & Canada Film
      11371
      7834674
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/007834674?cat=352440
      [437/595]
      Volume 27 Page 116
      Richard Turner yeoman Balltown
      Nicholas Turner yeoman Balltown
      for and in consideration of the love and affection I have and bear to my son Nicholas Turner
      land in Balltown
      beginning on Sheepscutt River 100 rods from the north line of land belonging to Abraham Choate
      thence running up the river 350 rods
      thence from said river northwest holding the width of 350 rods 1 miles
      700 acres
      ...that I will warrant the same to the said Nicholas and his heirs and assigns forever
      1 July 1791
      Richar Turner
      Wit: Thomas Rice, Rebecca Rice

      [309/463]
      Book 34 1795
      Thomas Turner to Martin Carlow 210
      Land records v. 34-35 1795
      Family History Library
      United States & Canada Film
      11375
      8128468
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/008128468?cat=352440
      [224/570]
      Thomas Turner yeoman Balltown
      Martin Carlow yeoman Balltown
      50 pounds
      quit claim
      land in Balltown
      beginning at the northwest corner of Abraham Choate's land at an hemlock tree
      thence running southwest 170 poles to a pine tree
      thence northwest to the five mile lots
      thence northwest extending on the said five mile lots 170 poles
      thence southeast to the bounds first mentioned
      150 acres
      2 October 1794
      Thomas Turner
      Wit: Orchard Cook

      Book 35 1795
      Thomas Turner to Bridge & Bowman 22
      Land records v. 34-35 1795
      Family History Library
      United States & Canada Film
      11375
      8128468
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/008128468?cat=352440
      [316/570]
      Thomas Turner yeoman Balltown
      Bridge & Bowan traders Dresden
      3 pounds
      quit claim
      land in Balltown
      described
      1 acre
      part of the lot on which the said Turner now lives
      29 June 1795
      Thomas Turner
      Sarah Turner [Her mark]
      Wit: Hannah Davis, Peter Laberee
    • Richard Turner's Lot

      1000 acres surveyed for Richard Turner in 1775 on the west side of the Sheepscot: From No 28 147 a D F Crowell through about C Finn 114 a No 20

      Richard Turner to Nicholas Turner 116
      Land records v. 26-27 1790-1791
      Family History Library
      United States & Canada Film
      11371
      7834674
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/007834674?cat=352440
      [437/595]
      Richard Turner yeoman Balltown
      Nicholas Turner yeoman Balltown
      for and in consideration of the love and affection I have and bear to my son Nicholas Turner
      land in Balltown
      beginning on Sheepscutt River 100 rods from the north line of land belonging to Abraham Choate
      thence running up the river 350 rods
      thence from said river northwest holding the width of 350 rods 1 mile
      700 acres
      ...that I will warrant the same to the said Nicholas and his heirs and assigns forever
      1 July 1791
      Richar Turner
      Wit: Thomas Rice, Rebecca Rice

      Land records v. 65-66 1807-1808
      Family History Library
      United States & Canada Film
      11391
      8296823
      https://www.familysearch.org/search/film/008296823?cat=352440
      [150/559]
      Volume 65 Page 117
      Nicholas Turner yeoman Balltown
      Richard Turner r Balltown
      $800
      land in Balltown
      beginning at stake & heap of stones on the western side or bank of Sheepscut River
      thence running on said River about southwestern course to a pine stump for a corner bound
      thence running northwest 400 poles to a birch tree spotte for a corner on 4 sides
      thence northeast 75 poles to a hemlock tree spotted on 4 sides
      thence running southeast 400 poles to the bounds first mentioned
      200 acres
      9 December 1806
      Nicholas Turner
      Wit: Eliza Turner, Richard Meagher JP
    • Who is this Turner?

      British and Tory marauders on the Penobscot
      British and Tory Marauders on the Penobscot
      p 20
      Belfast
      Belfast was just across Penobscot Bay from Castine, and after the American defeat there in 1779, immediate preparations for departure were made...
      Soon after the evacuation of Belfast, a party of twelve men commanded by Sergeant David Jenks, ventured from Camden to drive away some of the cattle that had been abandoned, and which Richard Stimson, who had been left behind, probably with his father Ephraim Stimson, at Mount Ephraim, was to assist in finding. They made the deserted house of Samuel Houston in the eastern part of the town their place of rendezvous, and passed the night there.

      In the morning Jenks went to the shore to shoot wild fowl, and a dense fog prevailing, he was surprised and taken prisoner by three men named Armstrong, Cookson and Turner who had landed from Castine on an expedition of plunder. The better to deceive the men remaining at the house they marched Jenks towards it with his musket on his shoulder.

      Supposing them to be friends, Stimson and others came out to meet them. A struggle at once ensued. Stimson, although a small sized man, was brave and strong. Being summoned by Armstrong to surrender, he dropped his musket, and seizing Armstrong by the legs threw him upon the ground, calling to Jenks, "Blow him through." The latter immediately fired, the bullet going through Armstrong's brain, producing instant death. In the affray, Cookson stabbed Stimson in the arm with a bayonet. As soon as Jenks discharged his musket, he turned and struck Cookson down; but the latter recovered himself, and with Turner escaped to their boat.

      The thick fog rendered pursuit useless. Stimson always imputed cowardice to the remainder of the party, as from the house they witnessed the affair and rendered no assistance.
      ...
      A romantic incident in this connection has been handed down. A beautiful sister of Stimson was compelled by the British to hold a lantern at the grave, it being dark before the disinterment was completed. Attracted by her appearance, one Turner, who was of the number, continued the acquaintance, and after the war closed married her.